Dr. Larry Norton, Scientific Advisor of the Cure Breast Cancer Foundation, is the Deputy Physician-in-Chief for Breast Cancer Programs and the Medical Director of the Evelyn H. Lauder Breast Center at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York.

 

His research concerns the basic biology of cancer, the mathematics of tumor causation and growth and the development of approaches to improve diagnosis, prevention, and drug treatment.  He is specifically identified, however, with an approach to therapy called dose density, which is a new and more effective way of using anti-cancer drugs that maximizes effectiveness while minimizing toxicity.

  

Self-Seeding Theory

The Self-Seeding Theory, conceived by Dr. Larry Norton, in collaboration with Dr. Joan Massagué, at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, provides radically new insight into how breast cancer grows and spreads. Dr. Norton feels this is one of the most exciting new research ideas in the quest to cure breast cancer.

 

One of the key problems with breast cancer cells—perhaps the most important problem—is their ability to move and start new cancers growing, not only in distant organs like the bones and liver (called metastases), but in the breast itself. This behavior is “self-seeding,” recalling the way weeds take over a garden: not by the growth of each individual weed plant but by the seeding of new weed plants that grow in a confluent fashion. By this concept a breast cancer is not one mass but a collection of contiguous smaller masses.

 

This method of growth is indeed true in certain experimental models and research is ongoing to prove that it happens in people as well. It explains many aspects of cancer: rapid growth, disorganization, formation of new blood vessels, need to irradiate a breast after lumpectomy for cancer, and the association of all the above with distant metastases. If correct, it will provide new targets for the development of drugs to treat and prevent cancer. Since “seeding” is an abnormal process—as opposed to the normal process of mitosis—such drugs may not only be more effective but less toxic as well. Hence, the concept of self-seeding is not only interesting from the point of view of biology, but also possibly very important in the design of better approaches to cancer management, prevention, and cure.


 

 

The freedom to explore fresh ideas depends upon unfettered funding from organizations with the vision                         and passion so well exemplified by the CBCF. 

 

                       
                           - Dr. Larry Norton 

                            Scientific Advisor of the Cure Breast Cancer Foundation

Supporting Dr. Norton’s research

CBCF donates 100% of its net fundraising proceeds to support the research of Dr. Larry Norton and colleagues, for research on the Self-Seeding Theory of Breast Cancer. Donations funds this innovative research that could dramatically change the treatment for breast cancer in the future. Mounting evidence from this pioneering research is translating a theory into life-saving treatments.

CBCF donates 100% of its net fundraising proceeds to support the research of Dr. Larry Norton and colleagues, for research on the Self-Seeding Theory of Breast Cancer.
Donations funds this innovative research that could dramatically change the treatment for breast cancer in the future. Mounting evidence from this pioneering research is translating a theory into life-saving treatments.